phone
Home » News » Sediment Tracking course at Battelle Sediments Conference

Sediment Tracking course at Battelle Sediments Conference

Dr Kevin Black and Dr Matthew Wright will run a short course on 12th January at the Battelle Sediments Conference. This course will present information on “particle tracking,” a methodology not well known in the U.S. This is a practical “field-based” tool for tracking and mapping the movement of environmental particulates in aquatic systems.

Dr Kevin Black and Dr Matthew Wright will run a short course at the Battelle Sediments Conference 2015 on 12th January.

Follow this link to register before 18th November:

http://battelle.org/media/conferences/sedimentscon/short-courses

Particle-Tracking Studies: Application to Contaminated Sediment Transport and Fate Problems

Instructors: Kevin Black, B.S., Ph.D. (Partrac Ltd.); Matt Wright B.S., M.S., Ph.D (Partrac Ltd.)

Objective:

Present information on “particle tracking,” a methodology not well known in the U.S. This is a practical “field-based” tool for tracking and mapping the movement of environmental particulates in aquatic systems. All groups interested in contaminant transport and fate—practicing engineers, environmental agencies, policy developers and regulators, and sediment managers—will be interested to learn about this technique/technology. The simple goal of the course is to highlight the methodology and how it applies to contaminated sediment problems common to the American contaminated sediments community. The course aims to present the general approach to particle tracking and to introduce the range of tracers available.

Overview:

Particle tracking (sometimes referred to in the geological sciences as “sediment tracing” or “sediment tracking”) offers a unique field-based methodology with which to track the movement of environmental particulates through space and time. Utilizing this methodology, information can be garnered for source-sink relationships, the nature and location of the transport pathway(s) and the rate of transport. Aside from numerical modeling (which requires substantial calibration/validation), no other technique can deliver information in these areas, certainly not on a practical level. It is a relatively straightforward, practical methodology, which involves the introduction of particulate tracers into the environment (e.g., water body, storm drain, sewer, beach) labeled with one or more signatures in order that they can be unequivocally identified following release. Measuring the concentration of tracer particles in time and space provides a dataset from which the transport and fate of a contaminated sediment can be judged.Particle tracking is suited to a range of contaminated sediment management issues and problems, including cap stability, source-sink assessment, seabed stability, bioturbation, plume and dredge material fate and transport, and benthic siltation assessment. The series of steps that should be undertaken will be described and attendees will be shown tracing materials and taught about their utility and use in addressing common sediment management problems.

Outline:

1. Introduction to particulate tracers (geological analogues) and their use in tracking studies

2. Introduction to practical particle-tracking methodology

3. Stages in conducting a study—background assessment; tracer design and manufacture; hydraulic similarity testing; tracer introduction; field survey and sampling; tracer measurement and quantification; data interpretation

Laptops are not required for this course. Physical examples of tracers, a small UV lamp, and a small permanent magnet will be provided.

Contact: kblack@partrac.com

The Eighth International Conference on Remediation and Management of Contaminated Sediments will be held January 12-15, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Conference is organized and presented by Battelle and Sponsors including public-and private-sector organizations active in environmental assessment, remediation and management. Attendance is expected to be 900 to 1,000 scientists, engineers, regulators, remediation site owners, constructors, and other environmental professionals representing universities, government agencies, consultants, and R&D and service firms from approximately 30 countries.

Share this: